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Gloria Couldn't Feed 'Em, So She Didn't Breed 'Em

By Gloria Diaz

Check out Gloria's Blog — Edge of Gloria!

Fort Wayne Reader

2009-11-09


It seems like the harder things are economically, the more we as a nation point fingers and become cold-hearted. I saw an article in People magazine recently about folks moving back in with their parents, or moving in with neighbors or friends. There were a couple letters published a few weeks later commenting on this story. One felt that the so-called “stigma” of adult children moving back in would fade away due to the tough economic times. The other letter blasted people moving back in with their parents, saying that their excuse was, “if things don’t work out, I can always move back in with mom and dad.”

Well, I don’t think people expect their jobs to be moved to Mexico. Yes, probably some of these people made foolish financial mistakes, but if you are downsized out of your job, how is that your fault? And if you worked hard all your life, saved some money, but lost your job, and now you’re out of savings and can’t pay the house payment, what ARE you supposed to do?

I imagine the second letter writer was one of millions of kids thrown out of their house the minute they graduated high school back in the 1950’s or 1960’s, found a job — or a husband with a good job — and have been living a placid, middle-class existence ever since. I hope her lifestyle gets ruthlessly snatched away from her; maybe then she’ll get a clue. I don’t understand why during such a tough economic time, we look down on people sharing housing, or sneer at a parent who offers a couch for one of her children. I guess because failure is for losers, right? If you are jobless for any reason, you’re a bum, and if you’ve applied for 500 jobs in the last couple months and can’t find anything, well, geez! You might as well commit suicide, you lazy, worthless, loser, unemployed, slacker bum. Don’t own a gun? Then steal one and some bullets as well.

That being said, I roll my eyes at retirees on Social Security and Medicare, screaming about the evils of socialism. Hmmm, aren’t programs like unemployment, Social Security, welfare, food stamps, AFDC and WIC classified as government help? Aren’t they “social programs”? Gasp! It’s hilarious to me how people are against social programs, unless they are benefiting from them. I know someone who got his last girlfriend pregnant. He obviously hates Obama, hates social programs and thinks people should “just get a job,” yet his ex-girlfriend ended up getting WIC and may still be getting it. He seemed to be okay with that. He got his current girlfriend pregnant (incidentally, she works two jobs and is going to school and doesn’t have medical insurance) and I wonder what sort of programs she’ll try to get. But it’s okay; see, because after all, both of them are working and are paying into the “system.” They earn every cent of whatever help they are eligible to get, because they’ve EARNED it.

That being said, since I’ve been able to have kids since the age of 14, I would like my responsibility payment. I figure, since I could have had children but chose not to, I deserve and yes, have EARNED a tidy sum for not bringing in any children into the world I couldn’t afford to raise. Unlike millions of others, I have looked at my financial situation, my jobs and made the ultimate sacrifice for a woman: I decided not to have kids.

Actually, I never really wanted kids in the first place. Occasionally, and this is rare, I think about what it would have been like, had I a stable career, a better financial picture and had met the right guy at the right time, to have had a little girl. But since I decided I couldn’t do as good of a job as my parents did, I gave up on ever having kids.
So since I figured I saved the welfare system by not having kids I couldn’t afford, I would like my responsibility benefit. I’ll settle for a mere $200,000, figuring I’d probably have at least two kids, who would be 20 by now if I’d had both of them by the age of 22. Back then, it was estimated that it took $100,000 to raise a kid from birth to age 18. So, I think $200,000 is about right.

But instead of thanks, I get stares. “You DON’T have kids?” exclaim other women. No. I sacrificed the opportunity to pass on my genes in order to make the state and my country a better place. Those resources I might have used were instead used by other people.
Holy crap! If that isn’t socialism, what is?

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